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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 57-62

Vitamin D status in women with pelvic floor disorders: A meta-analysis of observational studies


1 Reproductive Health Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran
2 School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
3 Health Policy Research Center, Institute of Health, Student Research Committee, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
4 Health Policy Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
5 Biology Department, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran
6 Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Zatollah Asemi
Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jmh.JMH_9_19

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The current evidence regarding the association between vitamin D status and pelvic floor disorder (PFD) are inconclusive. This meta-analysis was aimed to summarize existing data demonstrating the association between Vitamin D status and PFD using published observational studies. All national and international databases including Web of Science, PubMed, Google Scholar, and Scopus were searched up until January 30, 2018, and related published studies retrieved for meta-analysis. The effect sizes of Vitamin D status were presented as standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI), using random-effect models and inverse variance method. The Cochran Q statistic and I2 tests were used to evaluate the heterogeneity across included studies. Seven studies with 3219 women were included our meta-analysis. There was heterogeneity existing among included studies (I2 = 96.4%, P < 0.001), so a random-effect model was used. The findings of this meta-analysis revealed that the mean serum Vitamin D levels in women with PFD were significantly lower than healthy women (SMD −0.60; 95% CI, −1.06, −0.13; P = 0.01). This meta-analysis demonstrates lower levels of serum Vitamin D in women with PFD rather than healthy women. Additional prospective studies regarding the association between Vitamin D status and PFD are required to confirm our findings.


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